Tag Archives: Personal Mission Statement

Final Thoughts on Mission Statements

 

In coming up with a mission statement, it’s good and easy to have one; yet, much more difficult to stick with it.  In Part 1, “what makes you unique?,” we address & answer that first, most vital question.  It’s the map that sets us on our journey.  In Part 2, “what’s your rally cry, your top priority?,” we address & answer how to eliminate stress by focusing on one area (rally cry) in our lives we can work on (& achieve in 2-6 months), which will help us stick to our journey.  Now, in Part 3, the final question remains.

Question #3: How do you talk about and use the answers to your questions?

It’s one thing to know what makes you unique.  It’s also another to know one area to focus on to eliminate stress & lack of vision/focus.  Yet, it’s another thing to know how you are going to accomplish it.  We could write a grandiose mission statements filled with our core values & strategic values.  We could have our rally cry that sings in unison with our soul & mind, creating a Zen-like space, free of clutter & distraction.  Better yet, picture yourself 50 lbs overweight.  You tell yourself, “I’m better than this.  I deserve more for my life!”  So, you go out and buy some exercise clothing, rid your house of the junk food and fill your fridge with clean, nutritious food.  You tell yourself, “By the end of the year, I’m going to be one hot mama/dude!”  You make the appointment with the gym and start your regime to better health.  After your first workout you think, “this is hard, I don’t know if I can do this.”  You look in your fridge and wonder, “salad with chicken doesn’t sound appetizing.” Your body says, “OH.MY.GOSH.  I didn’t know there were muscles here,” you’re in pain.  You go the next day to stick with the plan, because you remember your long-term goal.  Yet, by the second week, you sleep in…missing the gym.  You begin to buy a couple more food items away from what you intended.  You find yourself paying for a gym membership that isn’t being used.  Question 3 helps us continue going to the gym, eating healthily without letting the food rot and the exercise clothes sit clean in the drawer.  Here’s how…

1. Find a time every week to evaluate.

Spend 10 minutes every week (preferably on the same day) going over your ‘rally cry’ and the defining objectives & standard objectives.  Are you finding that your defining objectives might have been too vague (notice I redefined one of mine)?  Or did you try to over achieve?  Were the objectives too narrow that no one could fit through them?  If so, you might need to tweak it a bit.  If you find it hard doing this on your own, then maybe there is a trusted friend or spouse you could share your rally cry with and they can help you with accountability.

2. Keep it Visible

It’s one thing to have your mission statement, rally cry, & objectives written out.  It’s another thing to have them in clear view to see everyday.  Keep them posted for you to see and be reminded of who you are and where you are headed. Put them in a place you walk past every single day.

Kamille’s Scoreboard

1. What is my top priority right now?

My Rallying Cry: “Creating a gentle spirit that listens.”

Defining Objectives:

  1. Spend time in solitude every week (have scheduled internet times).
  2. Pray earnestly for the Spirit’s empowerment daily, begin with this each morning.
  3. Journal 3xs a week.
  4. Spend quality listening time with each family member everyday (start with five minutes).
  5. Cultivate a heart that allows interruptions, mess…play with the girls, embracing this daily.
  6. Update: Go to bed by 10:00, in order to have a well rested body & spirit.

Standard Objectives:

  1. Exercise & maintain health
  2. Marriage
  3. Home administration
  4. Girls & family fun (means our family of four)
  5. My Spiritual Life

2. What makes me unique?

I’ve been blessed with a sensitive spirit, which is moved into action by standing up for righteousness, especially for people. I value my relationship with Jesus and how he has imparted me with a storyteller’s heart and redeemed my story. Through this, I am called to encourage & empower my family & others to find their story and how to connect to others with it. I also value good, quality food and love creating nutritious & delicious food through cooking & baking. All of these have ignited a strong call to genuine hospitality within me.

3. How will I talk about and use the answers to this information?

I will spend time on Sunday afternoon evaluating how effective I have been in following the defining objectives.  I will include Ben on this conversation for accountability.  I will look over journal entries & track my sleep time as well for encouragement.

 

Where are you finding yourself among these questions?  Where in your life is asking to be your rally cry?  Which question seems the most discouraging or daunting?  Add to the conversation to impart your unique perspective.

 

Part 1, 2, & 3 have been influenced & inspired by Patrick Lencioni’s book The 3 Big Questions for a Frantic Family.
A Year Ago: Mascarpone Chocolate Cheesecake
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A Mission Statement…Now What?


Part 1: What Makes You Unique?: Writing a Personal Mission Statement

Can I just say that I feel very “legit” and “organizational” writing up posts like this one and How to Write a Personal Mission Statement?  I’m a bit scared, not because it’s totally out of the ordinary, but how much I love this sort of thing and my nerdy side is coming out.  You might also be thinking, “how does writing a personal mission statement have anything to do with Evangitality?”  I would wage to say it has everything to do with it.  Whether, you are a free-spirit individual embracing spontaneity & labeled with a “P” on Myers-Briggs; or, you like a bit more structure, and direction of where you are headed with a “J” on Myers-Briggs…all of us need to have some element of intentionality in life.  We need to know what it is we value and who we are if we are going to show genuine love & hospitality to the many people we encounter.

So, maybe you finished your personal mission statement and are wondering what you do with it?  Or you haven’t started and you don’t know if you ever will, because let’s face it, there is still that box of old stories on tape that you promised your husband you would go through to declutter and bring order to your life (oops, maybe that’s just me?).  Either way, I believe having a mission statement is good for destination & keeping one on track.  However, a mission statement alone doesn’t help us navigate through the journey to get to the final destination, which is what question 2 of the Big 3 Questions addresses…

1. What is your rally cry?  What is your Top Priority?

It doesn’t take much to figure out your rally cry–really, it doesn’t.  Make a list of a couple things that you see right here and now as a hindrance to get to your destination.  It’s not a science.  Overthinkers need not apply.  Choose something that you can achieve within 2-6 months–that’s it.  It your rally cry can be fixed in a week, don’t choose it.  If it’s something that takes longer than 6 months…leave it alone.  Pick one thing to rally around.  Here was my list:

  1. Being gentle in my responses.
  2. Having an activity everyday for my girls.
  3. Do gross motor exercises with V everyday.
  4. Provide nutritious meals for my family.
  5. Provide spiritual growth opportunities for the girls.
  6. Develop storytelling curriculum.

As you can see, all of these happen to align with my personal mission statement.  And any of them would be good to pick.  I can stress (probably like others) about picking the best one, or wondering if I don’t pick the gross motor exercises for V then I’ll be throwing her further behind in her development.  Or if I don’t pick spiritual growth, then my girls might become spiritually destitute (a little dramatic flare thrown in for good measure).  But, when I boiled it down, I knew I wanted & needed a gentle spirit that listens above all else.  My rally cry is:

“Creating a gentle spirit that listens.”

2. Create Defining Objectives

Once you have picked your rally cry that can be accomplished in 2-6 months, write up five defining objectives on how you will get there.  These should be clear & concrete (and tangible).  Granted, my rally cry of creating a gentle spirit that listens isn’t as tangible (or even as measurable) as #2: Providing activities for my girls everyday; however, I think my rally cry is more essential to the person I desire to become.  Here are my Five Defining Objectives:

  1. Spend time in solitude every week (have scheduled internet times).
  2. Pray earnestly for the Spirit’s empowerment daily, begin with this each morning.
  3. Journal 3xs a week.
  4. Spend quality listening time with each family member everyday (start with five minutes).
  5. Cultivate a heart that allows interruptions, mess…play with the girls, embracing this daily.
  6. Update: Go to bed by 10:00, in order to have a well rested body & spirit.

Not easy, but doable.  Notice that I didn’t say I would journal everyday, or spend an hour (or even 1/2 hour) with each family member, it’s about scaling it to what I can do and building upon it.

3. Create Standard Objectives

Standard Objectives are those areas in your life that always need to get done while you focus on your rally cry.  Again, yours will look different from mine.

  1. Exercise & maintain health
  2. Marriage
  3. Home administration
  4. Girls & family fun (means our family of four)
  5. My Spiritual Life

Maybe after reading all of this you are feeling a bit overwhelmed?  I hope you give yourself grace as you walk through these steps.  Allow yourself the freedom to become intentional without legalism.  Look at your present, forgive yourself from your past failures and walk in freedom with your future.  When in doubt, watch What About Bob and begin chanting, “babysteps!”

A Year Ago: New Beginnings & Chockful Blondies and Homemade Graham Cracker Sandwiches

What Makes You Unique?: Writing a Personal Mission Statement

In the midst of life’s craziness, it would seem impossible to simply survive.  As a stay at home mom, I find myself trying to constantly balance out spending time with my girls, taking care of the house, making meals, caring for my relationship with Ben, finding time with close friends and find time for myself.  It sometimes feels like my life is like a gerbil in a spinning wheel losing sight of the goal.  Then, there are other times where I fixate on the end goal that I neglect the important right now realities of life (sound familiar to anyone?).

I began thinking & writing.  One can easily go to many of the “mom” or “homemaker” sights telling us how to bring organization to our life and maintain it (because isn’t the maintenance the hardest part).  These writers have great resources and have even inspired me.  Yet, sometimes it can be so hard to know where my unique voice is amidst the writer’s advice.  I find myself either thinking I need to be like that person, or feel completely inadequate and back to square one.  It got me thinking about who I am.  What am I about?  What is unique about me?  I went even further by asking myself, what do I want to accomplish here at Evangitality.

I had read this book, The 3 Big Questions for a Frantic Family by Patrick Lencioni, a while back.  The principles here are devising a family mission statement unique to your family, while addressing one family priority that needs to be worked on/fixed within a 2-6 month period (you work on one big issue at a time, not all of them at once).  These are the three questions  Lencioni addresses (I’m only going to address Question 1 today):

  1. What makes you unique?
  2. What is your family’s rally cry (i.e. the most important thing right now to address)?
  3. How do you talk about and use these answers to these questions?

Then, I got thinking about how I could easily write-up a personal mission statement using these principles.  My struggle is comparing myself to others & losing track of who I am.  I forget to listen to my unique voice and pay homage to it.  So, I needed something concrete & tangible to go back to when I find myself looking at what someone else is doing, or putting pressures on myself that don’t align with who I am.  Furthermore, I want to be a person who is genuine and encourages others to find who they are as well (not who I think they should be).  So, here is how I came up with my personal mission statement unique to me, Kamille.

1. What makes you unique?  Part 1: Core Values

Take a piece of paper and write Core Values on one side & Strategy Values on the other, draw a line between the two.  Core values are those attributes that are undeniable about your person.  You’ve never been able to escape them.  Think back over your life and you’ll be sure to see these core values in you even as a child.  They make you who you are–they make you…YOU!  This list should only be about five-six items and then narrow it down to two or three. Here was my short Core Values list:

  • Empathetic to others needs
  • Stand up for people
  • dramatic–storyteller
  • seeks truth
  • sensitivity/sensitive spirit
  • diplomatic in dealings
  • strong opinions

I took this list and narrowed it down and redefined, because you don’t want to use vague/general words (loyalty, love, caring) and came up with Dramatic Storyteller, Sensitive Spirit, & Seeks Righteousness (combination of justice & honesty).

2. What makes you unique? Part 2: Strategy Values

Under Strategy Values, write everything that is true about you.  This list can be as expansive as you’d like.  My list was very long.  My list included: *baker, *singer, *mom, *wife, *likes making lists, *kids under four, etc.  Then, when you’re done with the strategy values, find themes throughout.  I found that my themes were Family, People Oriented, Food & Connection.

3. Writing Your Personal Mission Statement: Putting it altogether

Take your finalized list of Core Values & Strategy Values and write a unique mission statement that describes you.  It doesn’t have to be eloquent or wordy.  It simply needs to echo who you are.  Don’t try to sound like me, or someone else.  Use your words, your language, your voice.  Your personal mission statement should be describing you.  Think of it as a map to guide you where you are headed.  You might even find yourself changing your personal mission statement when your Strategy Values change (and that’s okay).  Obviously, my mission will look different when my children are grown & out of the house.  Here is what I came up for me at this present moment in time:

I’ve been blessed with a sensitive spirit, which is moved into action by standing up for righteousness, especially for people. I value my relationship with Jesus and how he has imparted me with a storyteller’s heart and redeemed my story. Through this, I am called to encourage & empower my family & others to find their story and how to connect to others with it. I also value good, quality food and love creating nutritious & delicious food through cooking & baking. All of these have ignited a strong call to genuine hospitality within me.

I want to encourage you to find time to write-up your own personal mission statement if you don’t have one already.  I would love for you to come back here and share what you’ve come up with.  It will be exciting to see how different we all are as reflective in our Personal Mission Statements.

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